Geography (2018)

Geography matters because it is about human relationships: between people and the environment, between people and other people. A clear grasp of Geography can provide insight into environmental, social and cultural problems and help us manage our resources effectively.

Geography is available as a major for the BA and the BSocSc. Geography may also be taken as a second major or as a minor, subject to academic approval of the Faculty in which the student is enrolled.

To complete Geography as a single major, students must gain 135 points from papers listed for Geography, including 105 points above 100 level, and 60 points above 200 level. Students must complete GEOGY101, GEOGY103, at least 30 points from ENVPL202, GEOGY209 or GEOGY219, and at least 30 points from GEOGY301, GEOGY309, GEOGY323, or GEOGY328.

To complete Geography as part of a double major, students must gain 120 points from papers listed for Geography, including 90 points above 100 level, and 45 points above 200 level. Students must complete GEOGY101, GEOGY103, at least 30 points from ENVPL202, GEOGY209 or GEOGY219, and at least 30 points from GEOGY301, GEOGY309, GEOGY323, or GEOGY328.

To complete a minor in Geography, students must complete 60 points from the papers listed for the Geography major, including at least 30 points above 100 level.

Some Geography papers include practical work in the laboratory and/or fieldwork. Fieldwork is carried out in weekends or in teaching recesses.

Further details are available from the Geography Programme.

Note: Students who commenced a major in Geography in 2016 or prior and are undertaking their third year in 2018 will do so using existing 20 point papers. Students are encouraged to contact the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences for programme advice.


On this page

  • 100 level

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    ARTSC110Old Worlds - New Worlds18A (Hamilton)
    This multi-disciplinary paper offers students a rich context in which to develop arts-based reading, writing and research skills. It is structured around stories of cultural encounter and journeys through place and time, and focuses on a variety of printed and electronic texts, moving and still images, and sound. The paper is deliv...
    ARTSC111Social Science Theory and Action18B (Hamilton) & 18B (Tauranga)
    This paper introduces University of Waikato social scientists as researchers. Each presenter’s research will be discussed to demonstrate how it illustrates key themes of the social sciences and their specific disciplines.
    GEOGY101People and Place18B (Hamilton) & 18B (Online)
    An introduction to the new geographies of globalisation and cultural change. A foundation for second year papers on contemporary cultural geographies, regional geography, tourism, and Maori lands and communities.
    GEOGY103Environment and Society18A (Hamilton)
    This paper addresses implications for the global environment of different forms of societal activity. Content draws on the analysis of such topics as water, energy, climate change, and food.
  • 200 level

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    ANTHY202Polynesian Ethnography18A (Hamilton)
    An anthropological overview of the indigenous cultures of the vast ‘Polynesian triangle’, from their ancient explorations and settlements, through their engagements with christianity, colonialism and capitalism, to their contemporary societies and diasporas.
    ENVPL201Introduction to Resource Management18A (Hamilton)
    This paper is designed to provide students with an introduction to law and policy relevant to the practice of environmental planning and management in New Zealand.
    ENVPL202Cartography and Spatial Analysis18A (Hamilton) & 18B (Hamilton)
    This paper is the second year component of the GIS stream in Geography; it balances technical skill developments and critical analyses in urban and environmental planning.
    GEOGY209Health, People, Place18B (Hamilton)
    This paper draws on critical analysis of health, people and place to introduce contemporary developments in socio-cultural geography. Attention is paid to spatial well-being at a range of scales.
    GEOGY219Maori Lands and Communities18A (Hamilton)
    This paper introduces students to Maori geographical perspectives and examines key events that shape Maori communities and their relationships to land, water and other taonga.
    POPST201Population Studies18A (Hamilton) & 18A (Online)
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the multidisciplinary field of Population Studies. Students will develop a sound understanding of the demographic drivers of population change and composition, while exploring some of the rich theories and methodological approaches which comprise Population Studies.
  • 300 level

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    ENVP306Planning in Aotearoa/New Zealand18A (Hamilton)
    This paper extends students' knowledge of contemporary planning in New Zealand, and provides a practical understanding of the range of different types of planning that can be expected for New Zealand settlements.
    GEOG301Research in Geography and Environmental Planning18B (Hamilton)
    This paper examines the practice of geographical research via student-led, staff-supported research projects.
    GEOG306Disasters and Development18A (Hamilton)
    This paper investigates differences in the impacts of disasters between the so-called developed and developing worlds. In particular, recent theoretical developments in the study of disasters and motilities are considered.
    GEOG309Gender, Place and Culture18A (Hamilton)
    This paper is a forum for debate in human geography on 'difference'. Key concerns are the intersections between gender, ethnicity, sexuality, nationality, class, age and other social divisions in relation to space, place and environment.
    GEOG323Colonial Treaties and Tribal Lands: Comparative Studies18B (Hamilton)
    A review of the Treaty of Waitangi and the impact of European colonisation on Maori land tenure systems, with comparative studies of treaty issues and indigenous land rights in North America and the Pacific.
    GEOG328Geographic Information Systems18A (Hamilton), 18A (Online), 18B (Hamilton), 18B (Online) & 18B (Tauranga)
    GIS is widely used for providing information through mapping and spatial analysis. This paper will teach you how to use GIS, including an overview of data, analysis functions and applications.
    GEOG390Directed Study18A (Hamilton), 18B (Hamilton) & 18S (Hamilton)
    Open to selected students who, with the approval of the Programme Convenor, organise personal courses of study based on field or library activities.
  • Prescriptions for the GradCert(Geog) and GradDip(Geog)

    A Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma are available to graduates who have not included Geography at an advanced level in their first degree.

    For further details, contact the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Office.

  • Prescriptions for the PGCert(Geog), PGDip(Geog), BA(Hons), BSocSc(Hons), MA and MSocSc

    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in graduate Geography papers, a student should normally have at least a B average in either the best three of their 300 level Geography papers or all their undergraduate Geography papers. The requirements for admission to masters level study in Geography are set out in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Graduate Handbook.

    To complete a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Geography, students must gain 120 points at 500 level, including at least 30 points in research (normally GEOG591) and at least 30 points from papers listed for Geography. Within the PGCert(Geog), PGDip(Geog) and BSocSc(Hons) a specialisation in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is available. Details of the specialisation requirements can be obtained from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

    To be eligible to be considered for enrolment in the MA or MSocSc in Geography, a student should have completed either:

    a) a BA or BSocSc with a major in Geography (or equivalent) and have gained at least a B+ average in either the best three of their 300 level Geography papers or all of their undergraduate Geography papers, or

    b) a BA(Hons) or BSocSc(Hons) in Geography (or equivalent) and have gained at least a B+ average across all 500 level papers.

    Completion requirements for the MA or MSocSc in Geography vary according to admission criteria:

    Students admitted under a) above must complete 180 points from approved 500 level papers, including one of GEOG501, GEOG521, GEOG538 or GEOG548, and either a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis or a 60 point dissertation.

    Students admitted under b) above must complete a 120 point thesis, a 90 point thesis and a further 30 points from approved 500 level papers, or a 60 point dissertation and a further 60 points from approved 500 level papers.

    To be considered for enrolment in a dissertation or thesis, all students must have completed at least 60 points from approved 500 level papers and have gained at least a B+ average.

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    ENVP503Legal Principles and Processes for Planners18A (Hamilton)
    This paper provides students with sufficient background and skills in environmental and resource management law to enable them to be effective participants in resource management processes.
    ENVP504Strategic Spatial Planning18A (Hamilton) & 18B (Hamilton)
    Students gain a comprehensive understanding of the plan development process and the ability to identify and assess the importance of strategic planning issues.
    ENVP505Maori Environmental Management18B (Hamilton)
    This paper aims to extend student understanding of Maori environmental management in relation to the Resource Management Act (RMA) and examines co-management, partnership and collaboration, with hapu and iwi, in contemporary environmental management.
    ENVP508Plan Interpretation and Consent Processing18C (Block)
    This paper provides practical insight and skill in the processing of resource consent applications under planning legislation such as the Resource Management Act (RMA). A central focus is the understanding, interpretation and application of resource management plans.
    ENVP510Planning Theory18B (Hamilton)
    This paper aims to make students aware of the values and power relations that infuse planning practices and processes.
    GEOG515Maori Geographies18B (Online)
    This paper reviews Maori geographical perspectives within the context of colonisation and globalisation. It also provides an opportunity for students to undertake research on a topic of relevance to Maori using appropriate methodologies. Students will be expected to analyse the relationships between Maori communities and government...
    GEOG519Crossing Boundaries18A (Hamilton)
    This paper introduces students to the study of embodiment within geography. Students are encouraged to think 'critically' and to 'cross boundaries' in order to reconceptualise the discipline of geography in ways that address unequal power relations.
    GEOG520Human Dimensions of Environmental Change18B (Hamilton)
    This paper examines the increasing risks imposed on human communities by global environmental change such as global warming and the occurrence of so-called natural disasters. The paper establishes a platform for the critical analysis of these processes by introducing students to important theoretical developments including the role...
    GEOG538Automated Spatial Analysis using Geographic Information Systems18A (Hamilton)
    Automated techniques are the most practical method for the spatial analysis of large data sets. In this paper, students are introduced to program scripts for automated GIS analysis, which is extremely powerful compared to the 'point and click' environment, and is an area of expertise expected of GIS experts. An important part of th...
    GEOG548Advanced Geographic Information Systems Modelling18B (Hamilton)
    This paper provides a close examination of contemporary GIS modelling. GIS is used for a range of applications and in this paper students gain practical experience and understanding of many of these. Students are given the opportunity to develop GIS models in their choice of application.
    GEOG558Applied Geographic Information Systems for Research and Planning18A (Hamilton) & 18B (Hamilton)
    This paper is designed as an introduction to GIS for graduate students. Students learn about the use of GIS for spatial analysis and cartographic visualisation. Students gain 'hand on' experience with GIS laboratory exercises and undertake a graduate-level GIS project in an application of their choice.
    GEOG568Applications of Geographic Information Systems18A (Hamilton)
    Students work with three application areas: mobile GIS, point data analysis working towards location-based services and the analysis of areal data (such as satellite imagery or population data from Census sources) and their representation.
    GEOG589Directed Study18A (Hamilton), 18B (Hamilton) & 18C (Hamilton)
    Students have the opportunity to pursue a research topic of their own interest under the guidance of academic staff.
    GEOG590Directed Study18A (Hamilton) & 18B (Hamilton)
    Students have the opportunity to pursue a topic of their own interest under the guidance of academic staff.
    GEOG591Dissertation18C (Hamilton) & 18D (Hamilton)
    A report on the findings of a theoretical or empirical investigation.
    GEOG592Dissertation18C (Hamilton)
    A report on the findings of a theoretical or empirical investigation.
    GEOG593Geography Thesis18C (Hamilton)
    An externally examined piece of written work that reports on the findings of supervised research.
    GEOG594Geography Thesis18C (Hamilton)
    An externally examined piece of written work that reports on the findings of supervised research.
  • Prescriptions for the MPhil

    The Master of Philosophy is a one year research-based degree in which students undertake a programme of approved and supervised research that leads to a thesis which critically investigates an approved topic of substance and significance, demonstrates expertise in the methods of research and scholarship, displays intellectual independence and makes a substantial original contribution to the subject area concerned, and is of publishable quality.

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    GEOG800Geography MPhil Thesis18C (Hamilton)
    No description available.
  • Prescriptions for the PhD

    The Doctor of Philosophy is a three year research-based degree in which students undertake a programme of approved and supervised research that leads to a thesis which critically investigates an approved topic of substance and significance, demonstrates expertise in the methods of research and scholarship, displays intellectual independence and makes a substantial original contribution to the subject area concerned, and is of publishable quality.

    Code Paper Title Occurrence / Location
    GEOG900Geography PhD Thesis18C (Hamilton) & 18C (Tauranga)
    No description available.

2018 Catalogue of Papers information current as of : 20 November 2017 4:56pm

This page has been reformatted for printing.